Recent Publications:

 

Dynamic and Stochastic Fleet Management 

 

Regan, A.C. and J. Song (2001) Transition or Transformation? Emerging Freight Transportation Intermediaries, Transportation Research Record, in press.

 

Wang, X. and A.C. Regan (2001), Assignment models for local truckload trucking problems with stochastic service times and time window constraints, Transportation Research Record, in press.

 

Wang, X and A.C. Regan (2001), Local Truckload Vehicle Routing with Strict Time Window Constraints, Transportation Research, Part B, Methodological, in press.

 

Regan, A.C., S. Jagannathan, and X. Wang (2001), Mixed Global and Local Assignment Algorithms for Quasi Dynamic Local Truckload Trucking Operations with Strict Time-Windows, Transportation Research Record, 1733, pp. 49-55.

 

Wang, X and A.C. Regan  (2000) The Traveling Salesman Problem with Separation Requirements: A Comparison of Alternative Formulations, Letters in Operations Research, under review.

 

Lu, X, S Irani and  A.C. Regan  (2001) The Dynamic Traveling Salesman Problem: An examination of alternative heuristics, Transportation Science, under review.

 

Lu, X., A.C. Regan and S. Irani (2001), The  M/G/1 queue with Switching Costs: An examination of alternative heuristics, Queueing Systems, under review.  

 

Lu, X. A.C. Regan and S. Irani (2001), Dynamic and Stochastic Fleet and Freight Management: Algorithm Development and Performance Analysis, Proceedings of the 2001 TRISTAN Conference, San Pablo, June.

 

 

Behavioral Models/Impacts of Information Technologies

 

Regan, A.C. and J. Song (2001), Freight Transportation Intermediaries in an Information Age, Transportation Journal, under review.

 

Forster, P. and A.C. Regan (2001) Information Technology in Air Cargo: Interorganizational Systems and On-Time Performance, Transportation Journal, under review.

 

Regan A.C. and R. Garrido (2001), Freight demand and shipper behavior modeling: state of the art, directions for the future, in Hensher, D.A. and King, J. (eds) The Leading Edge of Travel Behavior Research, Pergamon Press, Oxford, in press.

 

Golob T.F. and A.C. Regan (2001), Impacts of Information Technology on Personal Travel and Commercial Vehicle Operations: Research Challenges and Opportunities, Transportation Research Part C – Emerging Technologies, 9, 87-121

  (Click here to see abstract and PDF file)

 

Golob T.F. and A.C. Regan (2001) Impacts of Highway Congestion on Freight Operations: Perceptions of Trucking Industry Managers, Transportation Research Part A - Policy and Practice, to appear

  (Click here to see abstract and PDF file)

 

Golob T.F. and A.C. Regan (2001) Trucking Industry Adoption of Information Technology: A structural Multivariate Probit Model, Transportation Research C - Emerging Technologies, to appear.

  (Click here to see abstract and PDF file) 

 

Regan, A.C., J. Holguin-Veras, G. Chow and M. Sonstegaard (2000), Freight Planning in the new Millennium, Transportation in the New Millennium, Transportation Research Board (CD ROM Format).

 

Golob T.F. and A.C. Regan (2000) CVO Perspectives on the Usefulness of Various Sources of Traffic Information, Working paper.

  (Click here to see abstract and PDF file)

 

Golob T.F. and A.C. Regan (1999) Trucking Industry Perceptions of Congestion Problems and Potential Solutions in Maritime Intermodal Operations in California, Transportation Research A - Policy and Practice, 34, 587-605.

  (Click here to see abstract and PDF file)

 

Golob T.F. and A.C. Regan (1999) Freight Industry Attitudes Towards Policies to Reduce Congestion, Transportation Research E - Logistics and Transport Review, 36, 55-77.

  (Click here to see abstract and PDF file)

 

Regan A.C. and T.F. Golob (1999) Freight Operators’ Perceptions of Congestion Problems and the Application of Advanced Technologies: Results from a 1998 Survey of 1200 Companies Operating in California, Transportation Journal, 38, 57-67

  (Click here to see abstract and PDF file)

 

 

 


 

Impacts of Information Technology on Personal Travel and Commercial Vehicle Operations: Research Challenges and Opportunities

Thomas F. Golob and Amelia C. Regan

(PDF file: UCI-ITS-WP-00-06)

Abstract

Travel, like many other aspects of daily life is being transformed by the information technology revolution.  Accessibility can no longer be measured only in terms of travel time, distance or generalized travel cost.  Information technology gives people virtual accessibility to a rapidly growing range of activities.  E-commerce has become a catalyst for structural changes in the freight transportation industry and is changing where freight moves, the size of typical shipments and the time within which goods must be delivered.  In this paper we explore some of the potential effects of information technology on transportation, both personal and freight.

 


 

CVO Perspectives on the Usefulness of Various Sources of Traffic Information

Thomas F. Golob and Amelia C. Regan

(PDF file: UCI-ITS-WP-00-05)

Abstract

The objective of this research is to understand how trucking companies perceive the benefits of traditional and advanced traveler information sources.  There is considerable interest in identifying the appropriate public sector role for investments in real-time traveler information sources.  Managers in charge of the California operations of more than 1,100 private and for-hire trucking companies were asked to evaluate the usefulness of various sources of traffic information.  These evaluations were collected on ordinal scales, and nonlinear canonical correlations analysis models were computed to simultaneously link company characteristics and perceptions of the value of information sources for dispatchers and for drivers.  In addition, perceptions of the benefits of a set of improved sources of accurate, up-to-the-minute traffic information were examined.  The results show how segments of the trucking industry value different sources of traffic information.

 


 

Impacts of Highway Congestion on Freight Operations: Perceptions of Trucking Industry Managers

Thomas F. Golob and Amelia C. Regan

(PDF file: UCI-ITS-WP-99-04)

Abstract

To better understand how road congestion adversely affects trucking operations in California, we surveyed approximately 1,200 managers of all types of trucking companies operating in California.  More than 80% of these managers consider traffic congestion on freeways and surface streets to be either a “somewhat serious” or “critically serious” problem for their business.  A structural equations model is estimated on these data to determine how five aspects of the congestion problem differ across sectors of the trucking industry.  The five aspects were slow average speeds, unreliable travel times, increased driver frustration and morale, higher fuel and maintenance costs, and higher costs of accidents and insurance.  The model also simultaneously estimates how these five aspects combine to predict the perceived overall magnitude of the problem.  Overall, congestion is perceived to be a more serious problem by managers of trucking companies engaged in intermodal operations, particularly private and for-hire trucking companies serving airports and private companies serving rail terminals.  Companies specializing in refrigerated transport also perceive congestion to be a more serious overall problem, as do private companies engaged in LTL operations.  The most problematic aspect of congestion is unreliable travel times, followed by driver frustration and morale, then by slow average speeds.  Unreliable travel times are a significantly more serious problem for intermodal air operations.  Driver frustration and morale attributable to congestion is perceived to be more of a problem by managers of long-haul carriers and tanker operations.  Slow average speeds are also more of a concern for airport and refrigerated operations.

 


 

Trucking Industry Perceptions of Congestion Problems and Potential Solutions in Maritime Intermodal Operations in California

Amelia C. Regan and Thomas F. Golob

(PDF file: UCI-ITS-WP-98-23)

Abstract

Efficient maritime transportation is heavily dependent on the smooth operation of  land transportation.  Swift modal transfers are key to successful intermodal operations.  In this paper we examine the efficiency of maritime intermodal transfer facilities in California, from the point of view of the trucking companies that use these facilities.  We also examine the perceived effects of traffic network congestion on intermodal carriers' operations.  Conclusions are based on a recent survey of nearly 1200 private and for-hire carriers operating in California.  Over 450 of the companies surveyed had operations involving maritime ports in California. These provided a rich sample of responses and significant insights into the current state of the industry.

 


 

Trucking Industry Adoption of Information Technology: A Structural Multivariate Probit Model

Thomas F. Golob and Amelia C. Regan

(PDF file: UCI-ITS-WP-98-10)

Abstract

The objective of this research is to understand the demand for information technology among trucking companies.  A multivariate discrete choice model is estimated on data from a large-scale survey of the trucking industry in California.  This model is designed to identify the influences of each of twenty operational characteristics on the propensity to adopt each of seven different information technologies, while simultaneously allowing the seven error terms to be freely correlated.  Results showed that the distinction between for-hire and private fleets is paramount, as is size of the fleet and the provision of intermodal maritime and air services.

 


 

Freight Industry Attitudes Towards Policies to Reduce Congestion

Thomas F. Golob and Amelia C. Regan

(PDF file: UCI-ITS-WP-98-09)

Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of the perceptions held by for-hire and private trucking company logistics and operations managers about the impacts of congestion on their operations and the feasibility and effectiveness of actual and potential congestion mitigation policies.   Responses to an extensive survey of nearly 1200 California-based or large national carriers are examined using confirmatory factor analysis.  The method applied facilitates both the grouping of congestion relief policies into classes and the identification of characteristics of companies which lead them to favor one set of policies over others.  This research comes at a time when California government leaders and transportation policy analysts are struggling with key resource allocation issues that will impact the short and long term future of goods movement in the state.  To the greatest extent possible, insights of CVO users of the transportation network should be included in the policy analysis process.

 


 

Freight Operators’ Perceptions of Congestion Problems and the Application of Advanced Technologies: Results from a 1998 Survey of 1200 Companies Operating in California

Amelia C. Regan and Thomas F. Golob

(PDF file: UCI-ITS-WP-98-08)